Maha Mirza

The rebellious women of our times

March 7, 2011
The rebellious women of our times

“Africa is poor because its investors and its creditors are unspeakably rich”–

Once commented by Naomi Klein, a Canadian journalist, who had depicted so blatantly the routine conspiracy and the day-to-day hypocrisy of global economics. Read more »

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Kristin Davis

Join the quiet revolution

March 8, 2011
Join the quiet revolution

Today is a special day. In China, women get the day off work. In Bosnia and Italy, women receive gifts of flowers. In Cameroon, women dance in the streets. What will you do today to make it a special day?

For 100 years, the world has marked International Women’s Day by celebrating women’s economic, political and social accomplishments. Read more »

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Ramya Sarma

Saas-bahu, soap opera, and life of a woman

March 7, 2011
Saas-bahu, soap opera, and life of a woman

Every year, once a year, the world goes crazy with all sights focussed on women. International Women’s Day, celebrated on March 8, becomes a marketing opportunity, with the spotlight set on the female buyer, or the female for whom buying happens. In other words, it becomes a marketing scam, almost, with lots of special offers, special events and even more special celebrations. Read more »

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Khademul Islam

‘Black Friday’: the PR disaster

March 6, 2011
‘Black Friday’: the PR disaster

March is the cruellest month for us all. March 1971, and now March 2011, the first a hurling into the Hall of Terror and now a permanent place in The Hall of Shame. ‘Black Friday’, it has been dubbed by some of our newspapers.

Public perception of the Bangladesh-West Indies match is at odds with the soothing versions – it’s just a game, there will be haar jeets, let’s now all calm down – being propagated by various well-intentioned levels of the television and the written sports commentariat. Read more »

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Ramya Sarma

In times of trouble, people power wins

March 6, 2011
In times of trouble, people power wins

The Middle East and northern Africa have been in the news for a while now. First it was Egypt, with the uprising focussing on Tahrir Square, a long and patient demonstration with enough power shown by the people to unseat Hosni Mubarak and bring in a change. Now it is Libya, with The masses clamouring for the elimination of Muammar Gaddafi, the man who has ruled with the proverbial iron fist, hammering his people into the ground, for so many years. Read more »

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Ishrat Firdousi

Brought down to earth

March 5, 2011
Brought down to earth

How does one wriggle out of this one? No, I wasn’t suggesting denial by us or the players. What does one write about this match? Was there a match? Even the much maligned Kenyans didn’t fare this badly. Whistle my way past deadline? The less said about this match the better? No, Sonia K, my opinion editor wasn’t going to stand for that. Read more »

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Maha Mirza

Everybody loves foreign currency; so brothers, hang in there!

March 2, 2011
Everybody loves foreign currency; so brothers, hang in there!

My dear brothers, who are stranded at the Libyan border, starving and freezing, hovering in uncertainty, we do understand your situation. It must be hard out there, particularly, not knowing what is coming next. Read more »

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Shobhon Shahabuddin

Opti-mystique Ash

February 27, 2011
Opti-mystique Ash

It was Muralidharan’s backyard, Colombo, September 2001 and Ashraful, just past 17 and making his Test debut, fares no better than his clueless team-mates who fail to crawl beyond 90 in the first innings after a typical terrorising spell of five for 13 by the greatest off-spinner of them all. Read more »

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Khademul Islam

The world cup: commentary as ghazal?

March 2, 2011
The world cup: commentary as ghazal?

Televised international cricket matches would be nothing – nada, nyet! – without its phalanx of commentators. There is no other sport which employs so many ex-cricketers ready to bring to its television viewers a unique discourse that makes the viewing experience of international level cricket a thing apart. Premier League football had, until recently when it discovered the market potential for ex-players to provided game analysis, too large a ratio of professional commentators vis-à-vis ex-players. They are still playing catch-up to cricket. And, say, for something like tennis, well, its set structure means that its commentary could add very little to the visual game itself. Read more »

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